Learn By Example: Scala

Learn By Example: Scala
Learn By Example: Scala
English | MP4 | AVC 1280×720 | AAC 44KHz 2ch | 6h 51m | 1.96 GB

65 examples that will bring Scala to life for you

These 65 examples will make this cool-new-kid-on-the-block your steady, reliable friend. Let’s parse that. Scala is cool because it’s all the rage for big data applications, and because it manages to be more sophisticated and elegant than Java. That said, Java is a steady, reliable friend – a language you can depend upon, and in which you can express yourself. These 65 examples will help you trust Scala the way you trust Java. Each is self-contained, has its source code attached, and gets across a specific Scala use-case. Each example is simple, but not simplistic.

The course will cover the installation of Scala – no worries on that front!

What You Will Learn

  • Use Scala with an intermediate level of proficiency
  • Read and understand Scala programs – including those with highly functional forms – written by others
  • Identify the similarities and differences between Java and Scala, and use both to their advantage
Table of Contents

1 You, This Course and Us
2 Introducing Scala – Java’s Cool Cousin
3 Installing Scala
4 Examples 1 and 2 – Hello world
5 Example 3 – Mutable and Immutable ‘variables’
6 Example 4 – Type Inference
7 Example 5 – String Operations
8 Example 6 – A Unified Type System
9 Example 7 – Emptiness in Scala
10 Example 8 – Type Operations
11 Module Outline – Loops and Conditionals
12 Example 9 – Statements v Expressions
13 Example 10 – Defining Values and Variables via Expressions
14 Example 11 – Nested Scopes in Expression Blocks
15 Example 12 – If_Else expression blocks
16 Example 13 – match expressions
17 Example 14 – match expressions – Pattern guards & OR-ed expressions
18 Example 15 – match expressions – catch-all to match-all
19 Example 16 – match expressions – down casting with Pattern Variables
20 Example 17 – for loops can be expressions OR statements
21 Example 18 – for loops – 2 types of iterators
22 Example 19 – for loops with if conditions – Pattern Guards
23 Example 21 – while_do-while Loops – Pure Statements
24 Module Outline – Functions
25 First Class Functions – Module Outline – Functions
26 Functions v Methods
27 Example 22 – Functions are named, reusable expressions
28 Example 23 – Assigning Methods to Values
29 Example 24 – Invoking Functions with Tuples as Parameters
30 Example 25 – Named Function Parameters
31 Example 26 – Parameter Default Values
32 Example 27 – Type Parameters – Parametric Polymorphism
33 Example 28 – Vararg Parameters
34 Example 29 – Procedures are named, reusable statements
35 Example 30 – Functions with No Inputs
36 Example 31 – Nested Functions
37 Example 32 – Higher Order Functions
38 Example 33 – Anonymous Functions (aka Function Literals)
39 Example 34 – Placeholder Syntax
40 Example 35 – Partially Applied Functions
41 Example 36 – Currying
42 Example 37 – By-Name Parameters
43 Example 38 – Closures
44 Module Outline – Collections
45 Example 39 – Tuples
46 Collections – Example 39 – Tuples
47 Example 41 – Simple List Operations
48 Example 42 – Higher Order Functions Introduced
49 Example 43 – Scan, ScanFold,ScanReduce
50 Example 44 – Fold, FoldLeft, FoldRight
51 Example 45 – Reduce, ReduceLeft, ReduceRight
52 Example 46 – Other, Simpler Reduce Operations
53 Example 47 – Sets and Maps
54 Example 48 – Mutable Collections, and Arrays
55 Example 49 – Option Collections
56 Example 50 – Error handling with util.Try
57 Module Outline – Classes
58 Example 51 – Classes
59 Example 52 – Primary v Auxiliary Constructors
60 Example 53 – Inheritance from Classes
61 Example 54 – Abstract Classes
62 Example 55 – Anonymous Classes
63 Example 56 – Type Parameters
64 Example 57 – Lazy Values
65 Example 58 – Default Methods with apply
66 Example 59 – Operators
67 Example 60 – Access Modifiers
68 Example 61 – Singleton Objects
69 Example 62 – Companion Objects
70 Example 63 – Traits
71 Example 64 – Case Classes
72 Example 65 – Self Types